05 4 / 2014

04 4 / 2014

04 4 / 2014

flihrty:

 ☆ gypsy/indie blog ☆

flihrty:

 ☆ gypsy/indie blog ☆

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03 4 / 2014

Because I kind of missed reading a Patterson, I clumsily rummaged through my brother’s pile of books and randomly picked a paperback from the Alex Cross series – The Big Bad Wolf. Having a brother who likes the same author has its upsides, yannow. So happy! :)
So here goes the story…
A delicate case comes up while Alex Cross is still in the process of wrapping his head around the job endorsement he got working from the Washington D.C. Police Dept. to the FBI and a family issue regarding his beloved Little Alex. There have been a number of abductions. It is believed the people who disappeared are being sold in the market. A Russian mystery mobstar named Wolf is suspected to be behind all the madness. Apparently, the Wolf has no plans of negotiating and surrendering. Alex and the FBI have to get to him first before he can strike back.
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I have always liked Alex Cross because he’s a cop with good character. He has been such an accomplished guy professionally, what with all the criminals and socio/psychopaths he has already put behind bars. I admire the fact that he really is good-natured personally but can also be sneakily genius and ruthless when the need arises. I think James Patterson has done a great job of establishing a strong and relatable personality for the Alex Cross character, hence the series’ success.

Continue reading on:  http://iheartnona.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-big-bad-wolf-by-james-patterson.html

03 4 / 2014

(Late post!)
Tandy Angel and her siblings have become suspects of the alleged murder of their very own parents. To prove her innocence as she was the primary suspect, Tandy conducted her own investigation which revealed a lot of discoveries about not just the deaths, but also about each family member. Tandy was surprised that she knew less than she thought about her parents and their means of nurturing their kids. 
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I’ve always enjoyed James Patterson’s works because though they are all very easy to read and fast to finish, they still manage to give the readers excitement and keep their interest for long. This novel is no exception to that magic.
Though I said that Confessions of a Murder Suspect possesses some characteristics that are usually Patterson’s trademark, I still somehow don’t see this as a James Patterson classic. I’m not saying I’ve read a lot of his books, but I’ve already read some. If I were to compare this one to his other novels, I’d say this was different because there wasn’t really a murder, which is basically what I always find in his books. Also, here, a teenager was the lead character and the primary investigator of the crime, not some adult cop. There wasn’t also a series of death or killings which was common in Patterson’s previous works.

27 3 / 2014

27 3 / 2014

16 3 / 2014

Norwegian Wood is a twisted, sad love story.
Shocked by the sudden death of Kizuki, both Toru (the bestfriend) and Naoko (the girlfriend) took it hard on themselves. Toru realized how much of his life depended on his dear companion. He eventually fell in love with Naoko, but she had to leave and be in a sanatorium because she was sick. While trying to keep his promise of patiently waiting for Naoko to get better, Toru met Midori whose company he truly enjoyed. When it had sunk into him that Naoko chose death over his love, he decided to move on and pursue a relationship with Midori.
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Death exists, not as the opposite but as a part of life. – Toru
I am not a fan of serious and sad love stories. I try to avoid novels with such theme as much as possible because sometimes they’re contagious. I get so affected and sad as well. Haha. Surprisingly, though, I enjoyed reading this one. :)
Norwegian Wood is definitely not a chick-lit. Yes, it is a love story, but it is not intended to make readers giggle. The characters were not in a good place during the entire story. They were broken and incomplete. They’ve all been struggling for love. There really was no chance for twitterpatting moments.
There were also many accounts of death here, most of which were suicide. Aside from love, this novel also talked about death and how people who were left behind deal with it, suffer from it. At this point, I believe this part is what made the book a deep one.

14 3 / 2014

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13 3 / 2014

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13 3 / 2014

12 3 / 2014

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12 3 / 2014

07 3 / 2014

06 3 / 2014